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Soft 13 A,2 doubles against dealer 5 through 6, otherwise hit. Wheel of Fortune Online. The dealer typically plays exactly the same way, regardless of what your hand might be. That list is very useful. Instead, try to break it down into chunks and just remember a few basic points about our blackjack strategy chart. A lot of players of 21 will choose to buy insurance if they get a hand worth 19 or 20 points off the deal, but the dealer is showing an ace.

Blackjack Odds

Blackjack Basic strategy

This is expressed as a percentage of your original bets, not counting additional money wagered on split hands and double-downs. See Blackjack House Edge video. The figures in the table are based on typical Las Vegas playing rules: The actual house edge varies with the playing rules in effect.

Many casinos offer games that pay only 6: Even the best 6: If you see a sign on the table that says "Blackjack Pays 6: To modify the rules, simply click on the Adjust The Rules button and change from the default options to the exact rules of your casino. Also be mindful that you should never take insurance. That list is very useful. But the real trick is to learn to variate according to true count. Of course prepare to hear complains at the table from players that play basic strategy exactly and think that is the Bible of Blackjack.

Do you know how many times I have been booed off a table for splitting tens with a high true count? Or how many times the dealer had an upcard if 6 and the cou t was like 2. On the other hand, the rules listed below tweak the expected return in favor of the casino:. A reasonable expectation of house edge for any given blackjack game you encounter at a casino is somewhere between 0. If you take some time to examine the chart, you will notice that it is really quite simple to follow. The dealer only has 10 card values you need to track, ranging from the deuce to the ace.

Looking at the blackjack chart, the blackjack strategy card tells us to stand whenever you have 17 points or more in your hand, regardless of what the dealer is showing for an up card.

It also says to hit if the dealer is showing a 7 or higher value card on the initial deal. After all, the goal is not necessarily to get 21, but to beat the dealer in whatever way you can. Mastering the game of blackjack does not stop at just basic strategy. That only helps you choose when to hit or stand.

Highly skilled 21 players know that splitting cards is a great way to maximize your profit potential. A blackjack guide helps you to know the best times to split cards. Splitting cards requires a disciplined approach to prevent breaking up strong hands—especially if the dealer likely has a weaker hand.

If you have any pair of 10s, Jacks, Queens or Kings, the strategy chart says to leave them alone and force the dealer to beat you. Unless the dealer gets 21, you have a great chance of winning on the 20 points you got on the deal. Likewise, the chart says to always split a pair of Aces and a pair of eights, no matter what the dealer is showing.

Another good example is when you have a pair of nines—totaling 18 points. In that case, you would split your cards and hope to improve at least one and preferably both hands. If just one beats the dealer, you get a push. If both do, you win a lot more cash. Another advanced blackjack strategy is the double down, which gives you a chance to double your wager and potential winnings after the initial deal. The idea is for you to lay an additional wager, but you can only get one more dealt card.

With the double down, when the first two cards in your hand total 11 points, the strategy card says you should always double your wager. If the next card gives you 21 points, you likely will win. When your hand totals 10 points and the dealer is showing a 10 or Ace, the strategy card says to simply take another card, rather than double down.

Yet, if the dealer is showing a nine or lower card, and you have a hand worth 10 points, the double down is absolutely the right move. In fact, choosing to not double down in that situation would be the wrong choice. In such a case, not doubling down would be a big mistake, as you likely would win much more often than lose in that situation. Those who count cards in blackjack can find doubling down to be particularly useful. Many casinos have a surrender play that cuts your potential loss in half after the deal.

The surrender is one that players find useful when dealt a poor hand, and the dealer is showing an Ace or card worth 10 points. In that case, you can choose to surrender half your bet, but exactly when you can do this may vary between games. Some casinos allow an early surrender, which you do before the dealer checks to see if they have a blackjack. There is also the late surrender, which you can do after the dealer checks to see if he or she has Knowing the right time to surrender requires using proper blackjack strategy.

When playing a single-deck game, the time to consider whether or not to surrender is when your initial hand totals between 15 and 17 points. If you have 15 points or 17 and the dealer is showing a hard 17 or more, the strategy says to surrender. You would not surrender, however, if the dealer shows a soft 17 or lower hand. Yet, if you have 16 points, the strategy indicates you should surrender if the dealer is showing 10 or more points. Like all blackjack strategies, this also adjusts for the number of decks in use.

Another advanced play that can affect blackjack strategy is buying of insurance to protect yourself against the dealer hitting When the dealer is showing an Ace as the up card, you can lay up to half your original wager on whether or not the dealer has a point card in the hole. If the dealer does have blackjack, then you get paid 2 to 1 on your insurance wager.

A lot of players of 21 will choose to buy insurance if they get a hand worth 19 or 20 points off the deal, but the dealer is showing an ace. They view buying insurance as a way to protect a strong hand, but you still could lose both wagers, or wind up with a push and a loss.

Basic Strategy in Text