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Summer Travels Posted on July 13, There are two different dealing styles: That is an automatic loser. Reviewed February 16, HoteLumiere at The Arch. Saint Louis, MO 1 friend 50 reviews photos.

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The desserts were an assortment of dried cakes and such, kind of like the selection at a low class chinese buffet. The best thing I consumed was my water. All in all, fun and clean casino environment, terrible comps, buffet is a shit show. We decided to try casino queen and unfortunately found the reviews to be true. Don't let them fool you about loose slots. Not true at all. We have way more luck at lumiere or river city. The cashier staff have no idea how the buffet works but they give you a free buffet for joining if you earn 25 points.

It took us bucks to earn 25 points and it only took about 15 minutes. One good thing is they reimburse half of your losses on your first day. The buffet was pretty bad The one positive is how friendly the employees were.

All smiles and very courteous. It's about 16 bucks per person to eat there and believe it's not worth it. Sorry casino queen we gave you a chance to earn our business but unfortunately you came up short. The buffet is only open two evenings a week, no selection, and overpriced.

I guess you have to play longer than 15 minutes Honestly I had a very pleasant stay there, staff was very friendly and polite. Would recommend the river view rooms. My wife and I are beginners when it comes to gambling so we were just looking to have fun.

The dealers were awesome and helpful as well. I won some and I lost some. My big complaint is the Market Street Buffet in the casino. I won't go there again. The food didn't taste good and service at the buffet was lousy. I would have paid extra for them but they didn't seem to want to sell them. According to the person I went with the steak on the buffet was terrible and had a lot of gristle.

I wanted the steak but I couldn't get any because the employee left the steak as one big whole piece sitting under the heat lamp uncut and out of peoples reach. It seemed to just be there for looks.

I tried numerous times to get his attention so I could get some steak but he was in his own little world oblivious to the customers and was absolutely no help. The rolls were hard and stale. In the event the casino was under attack you could have used them as a weapon. The salmon was ok. RV park sites are clean. But I feel the nightly cost is too much for what you get.

I have been to every casino in the area since I moved here 11 years ago with the exception of the Casino Queen. Not sure why I haven't, but decided to give it a try one later afternoon.

Its extremely easy to get their from downtown. I did pull up to valet parking and honestly wasn't sure exactly where they were going to come out from. I'm not sure if they were doing valet at the time or not, but decided just to turn around and go park myself.

Once inside checked out the food options along the way. They have a sports bar, steak house and a buffet. They have quite a few tables for the size of the building and they have always advertised the loosest slot in the area so I decided to go with the least amount of brain power and just play slots.

Their mixture of New to old classic slots is really good. About anything you would expect to see along with some I haven't seen in years. I have now been their 3 times and 2 for three at leaving with more than I came with.

In my world that's a really good thing! Can't wait to go back. What a shit show! Sevens diner was one of the most embarrassing displays of costumer service I've ever experienced! Our "waiter" clearly could care less about how he treated his tables. Couldn't even make eye contact or show any sign that he was actually listening to our order and clearly he wasn't we discovered once the food FINALLY did come out.

It took about 40 mins to get our food which came out wrong along with several other tables complaining about the same problem. Wasn't even that busy Not once did he come check on us! My husband had to go back to the kitchen to get the sauce that was supposed be on my sandwich and napkins and silverware after waiting another 10 mins after asking.

The staff had no idea what tables orders went to. What an frustrating experience! One star is being generous. Let's start with the hotel. The room is clean quick check-in. Downside was the noisy air conditioner and the thin walls. The couple next door had a loud fight and although entertaining after awhile it was annoying.

No room service so eat out or bring in snacks and drinks. For the casino the best part was no smoking. Most casino's I have been to serve free drinks when playing games. Next time we will try the casino's on the other side of the river.

This review is for the hotel and casino. Not the best place in the area unless your only here to gamble. There isn't anything close for stores, and the closest Walgreens was in a scetchy area.

I felt the casino was small. I had the buffet on a Thursday and it was the worst I've ever had, Maybe just a bad night but I'm sure this is the norm. The front desk was misinformed about discounts at the buffet. I was told there was a discount for the buffet for staying at the hotel. The buffet cashier had no knowledge of this. This place is the absolute worst place to stay in the southern Illinois area.

I'd you can, look at staying in collinsvile, IL. It's only 15 minutes from the casino and a world of difference in shopping amenities. We usually go to ameristar when we want a weekend getaway but decided to try Casino Queen hotel since it's so much closers. When we first arrived we were greeted by drunks in the lobby who wanted housecleaning to clean her boyfriends vomit in their room not a good first impression. Then we paid for a smoking room with arch view and we were put into a non smoking room.

We called the front desk clerk who gave my husband an attitude saying i didnt request a smoking room which i had our confirmation email showing we did. Then he wanted to give us a room facing the parking lot with no discount while I paid extra for an arch facing room.

Finally he said I'll call you in a little let me talk to my manager. A half later the manager thankfully gave us a smoking room with arch view. This room was also big and beautiful but the bathroom was disgusting we had hair all over the floor and sink and bathtub it was so Grose.

We were so tired at this point I spent 15 minutes cleaning it myself. Then our toilet kept stopping up the entire time we were here we called down to the front desk to see about getting it fixed no one ever came. Then we had their breakfast buffet and let me just say the hostesses were so unfriendly and rude never smiled would barely speak to us it was sad.

Now the workers on the buffet especially the waffle stand were great so friendly. We are definitely on the fence about returning. We love gambling and that part was great we walked away winners, but the rest of our experience was sub par.

And it's a shame because it's so much closers to us. A little older and grungier than the places across the river, and my luck is better at Lumiere, but the Queen is still a good time. Bad service, grumpy employees and a loooooonnggg way to park away from the building! Only 1 entrance in or out Stayed at the RV park for 3 nights. I will stay somewhere else next time I visit St Louis. This is the best casino in the area for value and play! The Casino Queen is great for table game players.

The table limits are reasonable with a variety of games where you can usually find a seat. Apparently they got new management a couple of years ago because we heard from other guests how they liked this casino but it lacked customer service. This was definitely not an issue now.

We play at all of the area casinos but prefer this one for drink prices and no smoking. We stayed in the hotel one time and had a pleasant experience with a great view of the city and arch. The best place to play in St. Louis for table games, reasonable drink prices, and fun Dealers. So the casino view is looking at a brick wall or parking lot. They allow smoking on the 6th floor and when we went into our room you could tell a heavy smoker was there so we were moved to a new room.

Only one elevator worked. The casino is tiny. The best part of our stay was the amazing breakfast and service. The food was wonderful and the staff top notch. Parking kinda sucked but all in all I was pleased with the stay. As a card holder for 20 years, until employee-ownership took over with new management, my review would be more posiitve with 4 stars. It gets 2 stars now for the following reasons: They think cosmetic improvements are the answer to pleasing customers. They eliminated one whole bar, replaced by machines.

The positive is slot-machine payout. They do have the loosest slots machines in the country. Outside of loosest slots, they're amenities are going down. Their monthly handle continues to decline, despite more slot machines.

Beds could have been a little more comfortable, but otherwise great sleep and service. Despite the address showing East St. Louis, it is right on the east bank of the Mississippi River and not in the actual town.

Don't let the Queen haters try to scare you. Everything is well lit, and the Queen parking lot doubles as a commuter lot for people going into downtown so there are lots of people always coming and going.

The Casino offers low limits on a lot of the tables almost every night of the week. Good variety of slots with plenty of payback. Cheaper drinks than you'll find at the casinos across the river. All in all, a "gamblers casino" where most anyone can have some fun no matter how much you're looking to gamble.

The Queen also offers a free shuttle to and from Cardinals home games. If coming from Illinois, the best way to save on downtown parking and messing with the Metro.

The Casino Queen Claimed This business has been claimed by the owner or a representative. Other casinos check under both 10 and Ace dealer upcards, and would therefore pay the blackjack immediately. Regardless, when you are dealt a blackjack, turn the cards face up, and smile.

It only happens about once every 21 hands, but it accounts for a lot of the fun of the game. The most common decision a player must make during the game is whether to draw another card to the hand "hit" , or stop at the current total "stand". You will be required to make hand signals rather than just announcing "hit" or "stand" to the dealer. This is to eliminate any confusion or ambiguity in what you choose, and also for the benefit of the ever-present surveillance cameras.

If you go over 21, or "bust", the dealer will collect your bet and remove your cards from the table immediately. In the face-up shoe game, you indicate that you want another card by tapping the table behind your cards with a finger. When you decide to stand, just wave your hand in a horizontal motion over your cards.

In the face-down game, things are a little different. You will hold the first two cards with one hand. To let the dealer know that you want to draw another card to your hand, scratch the table with the bottom of your cards lightly. Watch another player at first to see how this works. The dealer will deal your additional cards on the table in front of your bet.

Leave those cards on the table, but mentally add them to your total hand value. If you go over 21, just toss the two cards in your hand face up on the table. The dealer will collect your bet and discard your hand. When you decide to stand, tuck the two cards you are holding face-down under the chips in your betting circle. This can be a bit tricky the first few times. Don't pick up the bet to place the cards underneath.

Remember, once the cards are dealt, you can't touch the chips in the circle. Simply slide the corner of the cards under the chips. Describing these moves makes them sound complicated. Just pay attention to what other players are doing and you will fit right in. Much of the excitement and profit in blackjack comes from hands where you are able to "double down". This option is available only with a two card hand, before another card has been drawn.

Doubling down allows you to double your bet and receive one and only one additional card to your hand. A good example of a doubling opportunity is when you hold a total of 11, like a 6,5 against a dealer's upcard of 5. In this case, you have a good chance of winning the hand by drawing one additional card, so you should increase your bet in this advantageous situation by doubling down.

If you are playing in a hand-held game, just toss your original two cards face-up on the table in front of your bet. In either type of game, add an additional bet to the betting circle. Place the additional bet adjacent to the original bet, not on top of it. The dealer will deal one additional card to the hand. In a shoe game, he will probably deal the card sideways to indicate that this was a double-down.

In a hand-held game, the card will be tucked face-down under your bet to be revealed after the hand is over. Depending on what the dealer makes on his hand, it can be an exciting wait to see that card revealed at the end!

You are allowed to double down for any amount up to your original bet amount, so you could actually double down for less if you wanted. That's a bad move though.

Remember that you do give up something for being allowed to increase your bet: If the correct play is to double down, you should always double for the full amount if possible. And just when should you double down, you ask? For that information, just use our Blackjack Basic Strategy Engine. When you are dealt a pair of cards of the same rank, you are allowed to split the pair into two separate hands and play them independently.

Let's say you are dealt a pair of eights for a total of sixteen. Sixteen is the worst possible player hand, since it is unlikely to win as is, but is very likely to bust if you draw to it. Here's a great chance to improve a bad situation. If you are playing a hand-held game, toss the cards face-up in front of your bet just like a double down.

Then, in either type of game, place a matching bet beside the original bet in the circle. Note that you must bet the same amount on a split, unlike a double-down where you are allowed to double for less.

The dealer will separate the two cards, and treat them as two independent hands. He will deal a second card on the first eight, and you will play that two-card hand to completion.

Many casinos will let you double-down on that two-card hand if you want. No matter what happens on your first hand, when you are done with it the dealer will deal a second card to your next hand and the process starts all over. If you get additional pairs in the first two cards of a hand, most casinos will allow you to resplit, making yet another hand.

Typically a player is allowed to split up to 3 times, making 4 separate hands, with 4 separate bets. If double after split is allowed, you could have up to 8 times your initial bet on the table! Note that you are allowed to split any valued cards, so you could split a Jack, Queen hand. However, this is usually a bad play.

You will make more money on the pat 20 than you will trying to make two good hands from it. I wrote a post about just that: Why Splitting Tens is a Bad Move. Another oddity comes when splitting Aces. Splitting Aces is a very strong player move so the casino limits you to drawing only one additional card on each Ace. Also, if you draw a ten-valued card on one of your split Aces, the hand is not considered a Blackjack, but is instead treated as a normal 21, and therefore does not collect a 3: With all these limitations, you may wonder whether it makes sense to split Aces.

The answer is a resounding YES. For accurate advice on what other pairs you should split, consult the Blackjack Basic Strategy Engine. If you want to win at Blackjack, you will eventually need to learn basic strategy from a basic strategy chart or play the interactive strategy trainer. However, there are some quick rules and tips that you can learn as a beginner to decrease the house edge and formulate a strategy.

Remember there are more 10 value cards 10, J, Q, K than any other cards in the deck—so when a 10 will get you close to 21 and you are against a card that is bad for the dealer, you should double. A player 9, 10, or 11 would always be a good double when a dealer is showing a 3, 4, 5, or 6. This is because the 3, 4, 5, and 6 are starting cards that are more likely to make a dealer bust. The Ace is such a powerful card because pulling a 10 on a split will give you a Even though a 21 gained through a split is still only paid 1: Two fives total 10—which is a hand much better suited for doubling.

Insurance in blackjack is often misunderstood by players, and is a big money-maker for casinos. Naming this side-bet "insurance" was a brilliant marketing ploy, and some otherwise solid players will frequently make this bad bet to "insure" when they have a good hand.

But actually, insurance is not always a bad bet. For players who can recognize when the remaining deck is rich in ten-valued cards, this can actually be a profitable side-bet. Insurance is a proposition bet that is available only when the dealer's upcard is an Ace. When the dealer turns up an Ace, he will offer "Insurance" to the players. Insurance bets can be made by betting up to half your original bet amount in the insurance betting stripe in front of your bet.

The dealer will check to see if he has a value card underneath his Ace, and if he does have Blackjack, your winning Insurance bet will be paid at odds of 2: You will still lose your original bet unless you also have a Blackjack , so the net effect is that you break even assuming you bet the full half bet for insurance.

This is why the bet is described as "insurance", since it seems to protect your original bet against a dealer blackjack. Of course, if the dealer does not have blackjack, you'll lose the insurance bet, and still have to play the original bet out.

Insurance is simply a side-bet offering 2: Not surprisingly, the casino has a substantial edge on this bet. In a single deck game, there are 16 ten-valued cards. Assuming that you don't see any other cards, including your own, the tens compose 16 out of 51 remaining cards after the dealer's Ace was removed.

That creates a 5. It's even worse in six decks with a 7. Card counters can still beat the insurance bet, by only making the bet when they know that more than one-third of the remaining cards are tens. Unless you are card counter and know the deck is skewed sufficiently, just ignore the insurance bet. It doesn't matter whether you have a good hand or a bad hand.

If you have a blackjack when the dealer turns up an Ace, he is likely to offer you "even money" instead of the insurance bet. If you accept, the dealer will pay you the amount of your original bet and discard your hand of blackjack, before he even checks under his Ace to see if he has a blackjack as well.

Many players think this sounds like a good deal, guaranteeing a profit even if the dealer has a blackjack. But that guaranteed profit comes at a price. Let me show you how it works:. So, casinos allow you to eliminate the insurance bet altogether, and simply declare that you want "even money" for your blackjack when the dealer has an Ace showing. The problem is that you are still making a bad bet on insurance, which costs you money. A player who does not count cards should simply never take the insurance bet, even the "even money" variety.

Some games offer the player a chance to fold their hand, and forfeit half of their bet. This surrender option must be done as the very first action the player takes on the hand. In other words, you can't draw a card and then decide to bail out!

Even when surrender is available, it is rarely used by players. Often, the rules posted at the table won't mention it even if the casino allows it. And many players just don't like the idea of surrendering a hand. But for a smart player, it is a useful option, and reduces the house advantage by about 0. When surrender is available, make sure you know the correct strategy for using it. Most players who use the option surrender too many hands.

If your game offers surrender, I recommend reading my complete explanation of blackjack surrender. In the most common variety known as "late" surrender , a player cannot surrender until after the dealer has checked for blackjack.

If the dealer has blackjack, you will lose your entire bet with no chance of surrendering for half the cost. Generally, the dealer in blackjack must hit if he has a total of 16 or less, and stand if he has 17 or more. Seventeen is a weak hand, so if the dealer is allowed to try to improve the soft 17 hands, it makes the game tougher.

When a dealer is allowed to hit soft 17, it adds about 0. Almost all other areas used the better rule of standing on all 17s. Over the years, more and more casinos have switched to hitting soft 17, and there are now far more H17 games than S17 games. You can still find some games where the dealer stands on all 17s, even in casinos where some of the tables use the H17 rule. After splitting a pair, many casinos will allow you to double-down on a two-card hand that arises as a result of the split.

For example, if you split a pair of eights, and draw a 3 on the first hand, it is valuable to be able to double-down on the resulting hand of As mentioned in the previous section discussion on pair splitting, there are several common restrictions on splitting Aces. You will receive only one card on each Ace after splitting. Some casinos will allow you to resplit if you draw another Ace, and some will not.

That's true even if the casino allows resplits of all other pairs. Many casinos in Europe, and some in other parts of the world, handle the dealer's second card differently. In these "European No Hole Card" games, the dealer only deals himself one card at the beginning of the round.

After all the players have completed their hands, he deals his own second card and completes the hand. Contrast that with the normal US style of play. There, if the dealer has a ten or Ace card up, he checks the other card immediately to see if he has a blackjack. If he does, the hand is over. This process of "peeking" under the hole card to check for blackjack means that players can only lose one bet per hand if the dealer has a blackjack.

In a No-Hole-Card game, a player might split or double and have multiple bets at risk to a dealer blackjack, because the dealer cannot check ahead of time. This changes the optimal strategy, and means that players should usually not split or double against a dealer ten or Ace upcard. An exception is splitting Aces against a dealer ten. Note that there are a few no-hole-card games where the rules specifically say that only one bet will be collected from a player if the dealer has a blackjack.

In those games, although there is no hole card, you can play the game as if there were. That means you should play it as a Peek game, even though there's not really a peek!

It's all a bit confusing. When the No-Hole-Card rule is in use, and all bets are at risk to a dealer blackjack, it costs the player 0. Use the "No-Peek" option at our Strategy Engine. Ok this one's an extremely rare variation which I doubt you will see in any casinos today but I thought I'd mention. Similarly there is a rule variation whereby the player automatically wins when drawing 7 cards without busting which is called a "Seven Card Charlie". The most important item is the sign declaring betting limits.

Both the minimum and the maximum allowable bets should be on a sign on the table-top. Look around to find a table that suits your bet sizes. Make sure that the table you have selected is actually for blackjack, and not another of the many kinds of table games that casinos offer.

Look on the table for the phrase " Blackjack pays 3 to 2 ". Avoid any games that say " Blackjack pays 6 to 5 " instead. See 6 to 5 Blackjack? Beginners should start off playing the shoe games. The advantage in this style is that all of the players' cards are dealt face-up, so the dealer and other players can easily help you with playing questions and decisions.

Once you become proficient at the game, you may want to switch to a game with fewer decks since that lowers the casino's advantage. The dealer will exchange the entire amount of cash for the equivalent in chips, and drop the cash into a box on the table.

Take a quick look at the chips to make sure you know the value of each color. If you have any questions, just ask the dealer. Part of his job is to help players learn the game.

Once you are ready to place a bet, wait for the current hand to be completed, then push your bet into the betting circle. Your chips should be in one stack. If you are betting multiple denominations of chips, place the larger valued chips on the bottom of the stack, and the smaller value chips on top. Once the cards have been dealt, you are not allowed to touch the bet in the circle. If you need to know how much you have bet for doubling or splitting explained later , the dealer will count down the chips for you.

Once the hand is over, the dealer will move around the table to each position in turn, paying winning hands and collecting the chips from losing hands. After the dealer has paid you, you can remove your chips from the circle, and place your next bet.

If you want to let your winnings ride, you will need to form one stack of chips from the two or more stacks on the table after the dealer pays you. Remember, higher value chips should be placed on the bottom of the stack. When you are ready to leave the table, you do not cash in your chips the same way you bought them. The dealer cannot give you cash for the chips at the table. To do that, you must take the chips to the casino cashier. If you have a lot of low denomination chips in front of you at the table, you should trade them for the equivalent higher value chips instead.

In between hands, just tell the dealer you want to "color up", and he will have you push your chips into the middle of the table. He will count them down, and give you a smaller stack of chips that amount to the same value. This makes them easier to carry for you, and for the dealer it maintains his supply of smaller chips. Now you can take those chips to another table for more play, or head to the casino cashier where you can exchange them for cash.

So, if you have made it this far, congratulations. You should have a good idea of what to expect when you sit down at a blackjack table in the casino. What we have not talked about is how to actually make the best decisions while playing the game. That is a whole subject all its own. To have the best chance of winning, you should learn and practice "basic strategy", which is the mathematically best way to play each hand against each possible dealer upcard.

For a free chart that shows the right play in every case, visit our Blackjack Basic Strategy Engine. If you are looking to play from the comfort of your home, you can visit our online blackjack or live dealer blackjack sections for further resources.

Hopefully I've covered just about everything you need. But if you have other questions, feel free to post a reply at the bottom of the page. Our free blackjack game lets you play at your pace, and the Strategy Coach provides instant feedback on the best strategy.

To find the best strategy, use our most popular resource: The Blackjack Strategy Engine provides free strategy charts that are optimized for your exact rules. If you prefer a plastic card that you can take to the table with you, we have those too: Blackjack Basic Strategy Cards.

The original version of this explanation of the rules of blackjack has a very long history here at BlackjackInfo. I created and published it here sometime in It was widely copied by other sites, and it has appeared without my permission on literally hundreds of sites over the years.

When I relaunched BlackjackInfo with a new mobile-friendly design in , I took the opportunity to write this all-new version. Hmmm seems I have been making some bad calls for years now, I thought splitting tens against anything but an ace or 10 was a good move: If a player decides to stand on 15 for whatever reason and the dealer has 16, must the dealer still draw another card since it is less than 17?

Is there any significance in blackjack when you have a black jack paired with a black ace, same suit? The question came up on the multiple choice question on Millionaire. I guessed 16 but the answer was 32??? In playing 21 with one deck off cards aND two people playing, in playing Blackjack with one deck of cards and two people playing what is the most black jack show up.

Ken, This may not be the most appropriate page to post this, but let me explain the situation. I aspire to hopefully gather a group of trustworthy guys together to form a blackjack team. Team play is complicated and far more involved than a group of friends pooling resources.

There is not much published on team play. The following book may be helpful. The strategy does not change, but the player is worse off by around 0. As the dealer I get up to Can the dealer chose to stay and take the chips bet from player on the left.

But pay the player on the right? His rules are fixed.

5 Star Windsor Hills Resort